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Spreading the Word Early


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#1 Otyugra

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 05:31 AM

    My team at Otyugra Games is making a game that is early in development. One day we plan to crowdfund so that we can afford to put the game into a much deeper level of development. The problem is, in order for the future crowd funding to work, we need to gain a following on our game so that the word of our game spreads well (so that people actual fund us). 

   Luckily, we don't actually need a massive following since the crowd funding goal we will have is planned to be smaller than average. My question is, How does a small company with not much to physically show-off ethically get the word out about their game?

   Let me tell you more about our game, Paper Soul Theater. The game takes place in a fantasy land, but one based on American Indian culture and religion rather than medieval Europe. You play as an American Indian girl who uses a magic staff to heal allies and attacks enemies by holding verbal persuasive arguments with them in a manor that plays like an ordinary RPG for the player. The player is non-violent at the start of the game but slowly becomes corrupted with power as the game progresses. The game is a Turn-Based RPG with mechanics similar to Paper Mario The Thousand Year Door, but this game is more complex and requires more strategy. It has a deep story that makes the player think, and tugs on the player's emotions. The game had a mature romance between the player and a secondary playable character (though it is a game that deserves an E 10+ rating). Paper Soul Theater has a really sad ending (not many games can say that). The game is about one third the size of Paper Mario TTYD but is planned to be a high quality, professional game.

  • I run a twitter that talks about the game almost every day of the week and I use hashtags
  • I have a blog on my website where I talk about the development of our games and other stuff
  • I introduce my game on YouTube comments to people who say things like "I wish Nintendo made another game like Paper Mario The Thousand Year Door"

 

But what else should I do to tell people of our game? I am certain that many people would love to know about our game if they knew it was like Paper Mario, Darkest Dungeon, and, to a lesser degree, UnderTale. The problem is, advertising a product on most websites gets you banned. I have been talking about my game for a week and we only have 26 followers on Twitter!

 

Help.


Edited by Otyugra, 08 March 2016 - 05:36 PM.

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Two and a half years of game development taught me the joy of making something unique and unconventional. It is not good enough to make a game fun when there are way too many other freeware games that make fun their selling point.


#2 Ninety

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 10:21 AM

Hit Twitter with lots of GIFs. Use #indiedev, #gamedev, #pixelart hashtags where relevant (all are almost guaranteed retweets by bots). You should see a steady increase in attention, but it won't be overnight.

 

A devlog on TIGsource can have the potential to attract a wide audience, though this can be a bit hit-and-miss.

 

Also, don't get ahead of yourself. You've been working a week and don't have much to show yet, 26 followers is very reasonable. Focus on making the game good first and foremost.

 

EDIT: I like your concept, btw.


Edited by Ninety, 08 March 2016 - 10:22 AM.

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#3 GameGeisha

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 03:43 PM

I assume your idea of a budget is something in this form?
 

Total required: $x
Sources:

  • Crowdfunding: $x (100%)

 
You know from the get-go that you need to commission a composer before crowdfunding is feasible, but you opted not to invest any personal or company funds into it. Instead you think you can get around it with a couple of GIFs or Twitter posts.
 
Get a bank loan with your business account. Sell off non-core or personal assets. Do some contract work. Mow your neighbours' lawns or shovel their snow. Whatever you do, just face the reality that some of the money has to come from you.
 
The fact that you are making this post is pretty good evidence why this project should not be crowdfunded: It is run by someone with absolutely no sense of finances.
 
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#4 Otyugra

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 05:34 PM

Hit Twitter with lots of GIFs. Use #indiedev, #gamedev, #pixelart hashtags where relevant (all are almost guaranteed retweets by bots). You should see a steady increase in attention, but it won't be overnight.

A devlog on TIGsource can have the potential to attract a wide audience, though this can be a bit hit-and-miss.

Also, don't get ahead of yourself. You've been working a week and don't have much to show yet, 26 followers is very reasonable. Focus on making the game good first and foremost.

 

This is all good advice! Now that I stop and think about it, I see where I went wrong: I expected a large gathering to come immediately, but that wasn't realistic. I'll get a devblog going there, that will be helpful. I'll try to be more patient with getting an audience. 

 

[Is your entire budget from crowd funding?] You know from the get-go that you need to commission a composer before crowdfunding is feasible, but you opted not to invest any personal or company funds into it. Instead you think you can get around it with a couple of GIFs or Twitter posts.

 
Get a bank loan with your business account. Sell off non-core or personal assets. Do some contract work. Mow your neighbours' lawns or shovel their snow. Whatever you do, just face the reality that some of the money has to come from you.
 
The fact that you are making this post is pretty good evidence why this project should not be crowdfunded: It is run by someone with absolutely no sense of finances.
 
GameGeisha

 

    I can see where you are coming from, I needed to read that and it helps to breakdown where I went wrong. I get that you are naturally very outspoken. That said, I want you to understand that insulting people is rude; was it necessary to say that I have "absolutely no sense of finances"? For this reason, I didn't up-vote your post.

    

    You are right, a composer is important to get soon rather than after the crowdfunding. I guess I do need to gather and set aside money for this game. And lastly, I'll take crowdfunding very seriously when the time comes. 

 

EDIT: "You know from the get-go that you need to commission a composer before crowdfunding is feasible"

But is it needed? I thought it over and I realize now that I actually don't need a composer. You might think otherwise, but you can start a game on a budget of nothing. I've done it all my life perfectly, even when hiring an full time artist, programmer, and writer, why should this be any different?


Edited by Otyugra, 09 March 2016 - 03:12 AM.

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r7sNbRa.png  (Nitemare38 = Otyugra)

 

Two and a half years of game development taught me the joy of making something unique and unconventional. It is not good enough to make a game fun when there are way too many other freeware games that make fun their selling point.


#5 K3fka

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 01:57 PM

Well, when you do your crowdfunding you want to have a solid pitch. Make a nice trailer with your game in a presentable state, with good graphics and music. That stuff is not free unless you are fortunate enough to have connections with the right people.


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