Jump to content


Photo

How did you learn GameMaker?


  • Please log in to reply
52 replies to this topic

#1 rivo7014

rivo7014

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 203 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 06:30 PM

I'm purely just curious to see how people learn differently. I'm mostly convinced that people learn from YouTube videos and here on the forums, and I wouldn't imagine that someone would learn entirely from the manual. But I could be wrong. 

 

Oh and if you have any other ways of learning that would be great too! :thumbsup:


Edited by rivo7014, 11 October 2015 - 06:30 PM.

  • 0

#2 G-Games

G-Games

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1130 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 06:50 PM

I have never, ever watched a Youtube tutorial on Game Maker (let's not count that one about 3D projections), and I'm glad I didn't.

 

Youtube, as it seems to me, is the worst place for GM tutorials. They're overly complex, badly explained, and only show you some default code which you can copy/paste. Which isn't what you want. You want to gain knowledge of all available functions, and create a system which works based on this knowledge; Not copy/pasting someone else's work.

 

It's the pretty thing about coding: There isn't one good answer. It might be that your answer is slower performance-wise, and it might be that there's a faster way of coding you answer, but that doesn't matter, because it works, and you did that. Not someone else.

 

^ And that's the reason I dislike 90% of the tutorials (for GM that is) out there. You need someone to push you into the right direction. Not someone who tells you what to do exactly.

 

P.S.: As to how I've learned GM; I made games using D&D. Then, I learnt Java from "thenewboston"s tutorials (which are tutorials, like tutorials are meant to be), and after a year of so went back to GM, where I just had to figure out which function represented the one I used in Java, and I was (almost) fully capable of GM a week or two later. I've expanded from there on out by looking at snippets of code from other people on the forums and by making a lot (and I mean A LOT) of tiny games, just to get the hang of it.


  • 4

#3 rivo7014

rivo7014

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 203 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 06:59 PM

You know i have been on the YouTube videos a lot now and I completely understand what you mean. The level of thought I put into copying something compared to actually doing myself has a big difference in how I truly learn something. I have noticed that when I go to making my own game after watching a YouTube tutorial series I'm pretty lost, and that can be the most frustrating thing to do after you have just spent a month trying to learn.

 

Thanks for the advice.


  • 1

#4 Peridot Gaming

Peridot Gaming

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 27 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 07:06 PM

I used GM8 and 8.1, so have the books that were released for those which I have read through but never actually done anything with.  As a refresher when I bought GMStudio I actually watched and worked through the entire tutorial series by Tom Francis (the guy who made Gunpoint) on "making a game with no experience".  I wouldn't blindly copy down the code, I would actually try to figure things out as things went on.  And Tom is quite entertaining as well through the whole series - he seems to be making things up as he goes and makes mistakes too, so it's great when you can spot the mistake before he does.

 

The problem any form of tutorial, even books, is that you have access to the code and it is far too easy just to copy and paste.  The best way to actually learn is by doing.  If you run into problems, search around - this site and broader internet searches - and if you still can't find what you are trying to do, just ask.  That's what I have done, and even if it means that my search took me to a YouTube tutorial then I would watch what was being done there and then break it down myself and redo it as I want it (this is what I did with some of the effects that I needed in my first game).


  • 2

Find me on: itch.io  |  GameJolt  |  Website  |  Facebook

 


#5 rivo7014

rivo7014

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 203 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 07:52 PM

Yeah i watched a lot of his series and it was the best help I found on YouTube for sure. The only real problem was that I would lose interest every now and again, and would force myself to listen, oh and my laptop broke which had the game I had been making with his tutorials on it so I gave up at about tutorial 13 :(


  • 0

#6 GameGeisha

GameGeisha

    GameGeisha

  • GMC Member
  • 6565 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 08:12 PM

Why ask a crowd that is now known for being incompetent and worthless without expert help how to learn GML?

 

Having used GM for over a decade, I know how it's like learning from written tutorials by a qualified instructor whose motivation is proper learning. Mark Overmars' original tutorials, also known as the Sandbox tutorials, have none of the audio-visual charm that characterizes current YouTube tutorials. But they taught how to use variables, events and objects in sufficient detail for independent work later on, having a working product to look at was not an exclusive concern.

 

Contrast this with the current YouTube-infested state, where a large number of so-called "instructors" are unqualified wannabes. They fail to check their microphones, capture video at insufficient resolutions, and often make obvious slip-ups themselves from a lack of real skill. This contributes to silly questions like semicolons cutting if statements short, brackets placed where braces belong, and all sorts of illogical nonsense that nobody would have asked about a decade ago.

 

Even the qualified "instructors" on YouTube are just as bad, because their motivation is their channel's view count instead of actual learning. Basic skills like variable scoping, tracing and organizing objects are neither flashy, fun, interactive nor likely to be popular, but showing how complete games get made are. The result is a bunch of wannabes who can copy certain non-basic techniques but fail to use basic ones, like a bunch of self-claimed musicians who can play a couple of pop songs but knows jack squat about major and minor scales.

 

My advice to the latest novices: If you don't want to suck like the recent batch, don't use any YouTube tutorials. Learn from written tutorials that actually have an incentive to cover basic skills like variable scoping, using events and organizing objects.

 

GameGeisha


  • 4
Latest Releases:
  • GMLinear --- Matrix and vector math in one line!
  • GMAssert --- Debug invalid values and write quick unit tests with ease!
  • KameGMS --- Bring up TortoiseSVN and TortoiseGit dialogs from within the GMS IDE!
  • JSOnion v1.1 --- The stink-free way to handle JSON! (even deeply nested ones)

#7 rivo7014

rivo7014

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 203 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 08:51 PM

Well that was detailed haha, I do agree with a lot of what you have to say and I will indeed check out Mark overmars tutotials. And I have actually noticed that when I watched YouTube tutorials I am left with half of the information I need to actually know what i'm doing. Thanks for the advice :thumbsup:


  • 0

#8 DJ Coco

DJ Coco

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 131 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 09:23 PM

Tutorials, pre-made engines, self-teaching and a little bit of assistance here and there.


  • 1

RyZz54p.png


#9 Captain Coco

Captain Coco

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 19 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 October 2015 - 09:26 PM

Dicking around until things stopped breaking.

 

Honestly you just got to know logic and syntax if you want to program. Once you got those under control you can learn any language.


Edited by Captain Coco, 11 October 2015 - 09:28 PM.

  • 1

#10 Funk E. Gamez

Funk E. Gamez

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 774 posts

Posted 12 October 2015 - 07:26 PM

Lots and lots of trial and error. I mostly messed with drag'n'drop features until I learned how they worked. Then when I started learning GML, I started relying much more heavily on example files from other people and the manual to learn how to convert my DND knowledge to GML. Of course I used the official tutorials by Mark Overmars as well. I very rarely touched a video tutorial or a written-out text tutorial... You learn to code by coding.


  • 1

#11 xXMiliosXx

xXMiliosXx

    GMC Member

  • New Member
  • 14 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 October 2015 - 07:58 PM

Well, my background was primarily in High-Level programming languages such as C++, Java (using the Android SDK), and C# (using XNA). I experimented with different methods of creating games before I stumbled onto GameMaker. First, I read the manual to learn the syntax and then I started to tinker with the engine until things to started to click. For example, Timelines are great for things which need a lot of control on a frame by frame basis. From there, I started to really experiment (not trying to work on anything for to long that way I can explorer the engine). Pretty much, if you want to learn GameMaker I would say experiment or look at mechanics that are within a game you really like and try to recreate that mechanics with the knowledge and tools you have with GM:S.


  • 2

#12 Satchan

Satchan

    GMC Member

  • New Member
  • 1 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 14 October 2015 - 09:45 AM

Well, my background was primarily in High-Level programming languages such as C++, Java (using the Android SDK), and C# (using XNA). 

Same. I did the first tutorial with the clown clicking game just to get a feel for the drag-and-drop programming style.

To me it felt like a hybrid between usual text-based languages and LabView's graphical programming style which I found pretty interesting.

 

Besides that, I found taking apart game source code like Spelunky's a helpful way of learning GML too.


  • 3

Tryna get the hang of GM:S


#13 Andy

Andy

    GMC Veteran

  • GMC Member
  • 1988 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 17 October 2015 - 12:38 AM

I learned best by studying open source games, and small examples I found online. The GMC fourms, and the Beginner’s Guide to Game Maker 4.3 Programming by Carl Gustafsson, also proved very helpfull.


  • 0

Please visit my website, Andygames.com today!

 


#14 amysgames

amysgames

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 24 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 19 October 2015 - 08:03 PM

I also learned normal programming first. Started with BASIC, then branched off into other things like Javascript and C++, before settling down with GameMaker which automates a bunch of stuff that's annoying to code by hand, haha.


  • 0

#15 Funkey

Funkey

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 30 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 30 October 2015 - 12:40 AM

I wanted to make games, so I stumbled onto Gamemaker after countless other programs. gamemakers friendly but flexoble environment made me stay. This was about 5 years ago, and now I use it to educate and train myself to organise and how to manage multiple things. It has helped me a ton through school in terms of organising and stuff. 


  • 0

I'm up for a chat if you want to bounce any ideas about anything game related. Feel free to add me.

Big Smoke: Same things make us laugh, make us cry.


#16 Lonewolff

Lonewolff

    Permanent Resident

  • GMC Member
  • 3517 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 30 October 2015 - 12:48 AM

I stumbled upon it myself. Opened it, an then just started trying things.

 

Never looked back :)


  • 1

#17 New'

New'

    GMC Member

  • New Member
  • 11 posts
  • Version:GM8

Posted 30 October 2015 - 06:44 PM

Well, I have to make a simple game for informatics class.. in GM8. Still stumbling around and messing up. Someone recommended me to watch tutorials, so that's what I'm doing now. 

When using GM I feel like my IQ dropped below 'retarded', and I don't know whether to smash my head into my keyboard or rip my hair out, out of frustration. But when something actually works, I feel like the smartest person alive. Started a week ago, though. Still got 1.5 months to go till deadline. Yay, wish me luck! Gonna need that.


  • 0

#18 Jeuiop

Jeuiop

    GMC Member

  • New Member
  • 9 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 05 November 2015 - 08:53 AM

I learned watching tutorials, the heartbeast/tomfrancis ones are likely but just to see how they do stuff, how do they proceed to make their games no copy/pasting at all and then make my stuff. I have no background on coding so i recently do the cs50 course and now making my way on freecodecamp for learning other coding related stuff, i hope it will improve my GML code aswell.


Well, I have to make a simple game for informatics class.. in GM8. Still stumbling around and messing up. Someone recommended me to watch tutorials, so that's what I'm doing now. 

When using GM I feel like my IQ dropped below 'retarded', and I don't know whether to smash my head into my keyboard or rip my hair out, out of frustration. But when something actually works, I feel like the smartest person alive. Started a week ago, though. Still got 1.5 months to go till deadline. Yay, wish me luck! Gonna need that.

Why you pick 8.1 and no studio?


Edited by Jeuiop, 05 November 2015 - 08:52 AM.

  • 0

#19 Slasher_X

Slasher_X

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 127 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 06 November 2015 - 09:47 AM

I learned primarily through trial and error as back in the day when I started, I didn't have a reliable Internet connection at the time. I'd drag-and-drop this and that and sometimes it worked, most times it didn't. The manual was present, but I felt it a tad too overwhelming (or maybe I was just an impatient boob back then).

 

Once I did have a stable connection to the world of endless possibility and magic, I started watching videos, engaging with folks here on the forum and getting involved with the general game development community in my home town as often as I could. Rapid prototyping has always been, and still is, my greatest learning tool.

 

Having used GM for over a decade, I know how it's like learning from written tutorials by a qualified instructor whose motivation is proper learning. Mark Overmars' original tutorials, also known as the Sandbox tutorials, have none of the audio-visual charm that characterizes current YouTube tutorials. But they taught how to use variables, events and objects in sufficient detail for independent work later on, having a working product to look at was not an exclusive concern.

 

Contrast this with the current YouTube-infested state, where a large number of so-called "instructors" are unqualified wannabes. They fail to check their microphones, capture video at insufficient resolutions, and often make obvious slip-ups themselves from a lack of real skill. This contributes to silly questions like semicolons cutting if statements short, brackets placed where braces belong, and all sorts of illogical nonsense that nobody would have asked about a decade ago.

 

Even the qualified "instructors" on YouTube are just as bad, because their motivation is their channel's view count instead of actual learning. Basic skills like variable scoping, tracing and organizing objects are neither flashy, fun, interactive nor likely to be popular, but showing how complete games get made are. The result is a bunch of wannabes who can copy certain non-basic techniques but fail to use basic ones, like a bunch of self-claimed musicians who can play a couple of pop songs but knows jack squat about major and minor scales.

 

My advice to the latest novices: If you don't want to suck like the recent batch, don't use any YouTube tutorials. Learn from written tutorials that actually have an incentive to cover basic skills like variable scoping, using events and organizing objects.

 

GameGeisha

I too have absolutely loved Mark Overmars' original work! I believe learning shouldn't be about absorbing knowledge through one medium though. There are things a tutorial video can demonstrate that seemingly endless text and pictures just cannot! And then there are some concepts a small textual description can demonstrate that need not be rambled on about in a video...

 

I therefore cannot agree with your advice to novices. In my experience of tutorial creation, I have found that too many newbies are looking for instant gratification thus fueling a surge of "video tutorial series templates" all over YouTube that encourage copy-paste game creation (oh gosh!). Seldom are people willing to take the time to research the bare-bone basics (the time-consuming, boring, nitty-gritty stuff). Great video content is out there and some channels do make learning the small important things fun!

 

The material to do great things is out there in all sorts of forms, one just has to find them - What you take from them is up to you and you alone.


  • 0

Join me as we take on the world of indie gaming! - SlasherXGAMES -

youtube_zps2ccdb175.png element-earth-logo_zpsrmudywrn.png


#20 RekNepZ

RekNepZ

    GMC Historian

  • GMC Member
  • 718 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 06 November 2015 - 11:13 PM

I mostly just fumbled around for a while. I looked at the examples (Street Race FTW!) and tutorials and, after a long while, finally got the hang of it. It took a while though. I used D&D (which I feel is highly underrated) for my first year or so and then used a hybrid of code and d&d for the next couple years. It was slow, but I wasn't really trying to do anything serious. I just wanted to make fun little maze games.


  • 1

AczgxAZ.png

^kept in my sig for historical purposes^


#21 G-Games

G-Games

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1130 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 07 November 2015 - 02:59 PM

Street Race FTW!

 

I remember that example aswell!

 

Oh, the nostalgia...  :wub:


  • 1

#22 Alvare

Alvare

    Not an administrator

  • GMC Member
  • 1812 posts
  • Version:None

Posted 07 November 2015 - 04:01 PM

Lol, look at my post count. I guess I asked every single thing. xD

So a big thank you to this whole community of course. And I certainly remember those who helped me.


Edited by Alvare, 07 November 2015 - 04:04 PM.

  • 1

#23 DZiW

DZiW

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 978 posts
  • Version:Unknown

Posted 11 November 2015 - 01:13 PM

Learned?! Even Mr Overmars and GM developers don't use its all even official lex/tokens and features, let alone compeltely knowing it!

Knowbuddy knows...Nobody.


  • 0

YOU CREATE: WHERE LiFE MAY FAiL, DEAћ SHALL NOT!


#24 mr magnus

mr magnus

    Viking King

  • GMC Member
  • 3739 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 November 2015 - 01:27 PM

Never watched a tutorial. I learned trough trial and error; referring to the manual if I got stuck or was unsure; and tweaking and breaking apart code someone else wrote by downloading and building on top of examples. I experimented until I got the hang of it. 


  • 2

#25 roytheshort

roytheshort

    The Village Idiot

  • GMC Member
  • 539 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 13 November 2015 - 08:02 PM

Infinite Monkey Typewriter Method.

I just bash my hands against the keyboard until games come out. 

 

I heard that's how Electronic Arts make games, anyway.


  • 5

#26 Detective Pixel

Detective Pixel

    GMC Dancer

  • GMC Member
  • 555 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 13 November 2015 - 08:35 PM

Infinite Monkey Typewriter Method.

I just bash my hands against the keyboard until games come out. 

 

I heard that's how Electronic Arts make games, anyway.

 

So that's why you haven't created games recently...


  • 1

PIXEL_Archive.png


#27 Dan1

Dan1

    As Cool As Custard

  • GMC Member
  • 1901 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 03 December 2015 - 10:25 AM

When I first downloaded GM it was only on version 4.3 and I started with the drag and drop system, just playing around with it and experimenting - at the time, I was very young and just wanted to make anything so I saw a few of the basic in-built tutorials that were available at the time (much less than we have now) and just rolled with it and as time went by and GM grew, I just learnt with it - there wasn't really a tactic, just mashed the buttons and put things together until it worked - with GML, I tried slowly, first with adding a line or two into mostly drag and drop games then I'd just add more and more until where I am now :)


  • 0

xdatdz.png  2ypb5o4.png  oqhq4j.png


#28 MadeByJawns

MadeByJawns

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 33 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 06 December 2015 - 06:09 PM

First post, I am a noob xD But.. here are my thoughts... when I first started using GameMaker, I watched a couple of "getting started" vids, became familiar with the interface, then just planned to re-make some old game's mechanics, the reason for this is because there are already a million tutorials out there for all sorts of clones and this is great in exposing you to many different things at once and speeding up learning.

 

The key part for me though, is actually planning on doing something and just roll with it. For beginners, don't just watch tutorials for the sake of it, think of something small you want to make, do your best and then google/youtube when you are stuck and move forward like a checklist system, onto next task and next.

 

Imo a lot of people tend to watch tutorials and don't take anything away from it apart from what was shown, this is the problem and exactly why you need to make your own projects to shift your mindset a bit because if you ask for too much help or watch too many tutorials, you kind of get locked down into a way of thinking so you need to try to think for yourself by actually looking at the code you are presented with, trying to figure out what it does and then applying it to your project, this way, you can watch many tutorials or look at scripts and it gives you ideas on how to use those scripts in a way that actually has nothing to do with the tutorial you are watching, well that's how my brain kind of works anyway xD

 

It's definitely different for everyone but it is very possible to learn by yourself, I mean, this is my first post and I have been using GameMaker for about a year now, (though I took a couple months out so have only just got back into it these past few months) but the point is, I have made probably +10 working prototypes and just released my first very basic Android game and never needed to create an account and topic for help because I search for solutions and if there aren't any solutions, I try to look at any topics with similarities using other scripts etc.. and figure out how my problem correlates, of course, I have only ever made very simple games but I think even the simplest games, you can learn so much.


  • 0

gmbanner.png

^ The First Game I Ever Released! It's Not Good But I Just Wanted To Learn A Bit About Android :] ^


#29 Ravicious

Ravicious

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 90 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 December 2015 - 07:17 PM

I tried it many moons ago back in the early 2000's. I learned the basics using the drag and drop method in multimedia class. I wasn't aware of scripting until much later around 2004-2005 and it was a little intimidating for me to say the least. I tried making a Doom clone and a super mario platformer but they were terrible. I didn't have a real appreciation for it until 2009 when I started creating shmups, using mathematical substitutions to make bullet patterns. Now everything I do with Game Maker contains pure code and I cringe at drag and drop.

Most of my greatest learning experiences are from these forums. I would get stuck and ask politely and always received great responses. I also took computer courses in college and recently graduated with a Bachelor's in Computer Science. That enhanced my scripting ideas and I managed to implement those basics in my codes.

Overall, it was quite a delightful, painful, frustrating, amazing, amusing, and confusing journey!


  • 0

I am bad. And that's good. I will never be good, and that's not bad. There is no one I'd rather be than me.
~Wreck-it Ralph


#30 fetito666

fetito666

    Braaaaaaaaaaaaains!

  • GMC Member
  • 81 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 December 2015 - 03:38 AM

I also taught me some C# from other tutorials so that I have a good overview on programming in general and how to avoid bad coding.


  • 0

#31 SamimNoorzaiTGC

SamimNoorzaiTGC

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 98 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 18 December 2015 - 07:25 AM

You know why I love game maker? Cause IT IS ALMOST EVERYWHERE! There are thousands of references to learn game maker with.


  • 0

#32 sebastian97

sebastian97

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 67 posts
  • Version:Unknown

Posted 23 December 2015 - 06:03 PM

The best way to learn is just to have a simple goal in your head of what you wanna create (keep it simple if you want to get it done within a reasonable amount of time) and just find the steps it is going to take to make it. Start off reallyyyy simple, new devs have the issue often times of wanting to jump into creating their first MMO on day 1. 


  • 0

#33 Link5205

Link5205

    GMC Member

  • New Member
  • 19 posts

Posted 23 December 2015 - 07:47 PM

I mostly went back and forth messing with the program and searching the manual for codes and assuming what they meant. Everything else was bits and pieces I got from these forums and Youtube videos.


  • 0

#34 Sammi3

Sammi3

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 246 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 03 January 2016 - 02:23 PM

It was a mixture of reading the manual and trying to understand functions that I wanted to use. Going through examples from other gamemaker users or opensource games. I only used YouTube when I was really struggling finding out how to do something or I opened an example that I didn't really understand and that was my last resort. 

 

Idk, after a while of programming in GML things became really simple. I easily learned glsl shaders just by looking at examples and the good ol' trial an error. You then realize that programming is logic and mathematics and that as long as you were alright in both, you could pick up any language and run with it. GameMaker's learning curve helped simplify the learning process.


  • 0

#35 Zachariass

Zachariass

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 28 posts
  • Version:GM8.1

Posted 03 January 2016 - 08:15 PM

I started building some really simple games using D&D. After building the first few games I started doing more with GML untill I eventually stopped using D&D completely. I learned coding online games from tutorials I found everywhere (from youtube to gamemaker forums to other sites). I also got an open source multiplayer game from a friend of mine which really taught me the basics of how online games work. The scripts I wrote 4 years ago are often not very logic and need alot of improvement. I think that key to learning fast is to create alot of games and try out everything you'd like to know something about. I still learn everyday!


  • 0

2a64bxz.png

                                                 >>Release topic<<


#36 MistyEye

MistyEye

    GMC Member

  • New Member
  • 7 posts
  • Version:GM8

Posted 07 January 2016 - 02:15 AM

I read HeartBeast book, it was very descriptive, and cheap xD 


  • 0

Hi, I'm MistyEye, and on other forums I'm UxQ. I started coding due to my favorite game ever, The Legend of Zelda: a Link to The Past. I am currently 13, and i like to work on small projects, such as extensions, applications, and some small games. I can code in c++, c#, Java, Ruby, and GML.


#37 Kuzie

Kuzie

    GMC Member

  • New Member
  • 9 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 February 2016 - 03:39 PM

Moderator Note:  this post and two posts below it were merged from another topic about learning GML.

 

Hello,

 

My name is Tyler, I'm 22, working full-time at a bank, and desperately striving to become a game developer.

I am fairly new to using GMS. I used it along time ago but got frustrated with it / didn't know what the heck I was doing. After uninstalling it I dabbled in construct 2, stencil, unity. But nothing stuck. Unity felt like swimming in a tsunami and everything else never felt like I was making anything substantial. It was like building sand castles.

 

I am now back to GM and loving it (not to say it isn't difficult). I've been watching tutorials on YouTube and reading the manual until I get my head spun around and decide to take a break.

 

I'm coming from almost 0 coding experience but a basic understanding of the logic.

I'm hoping to make great games in the future and I realize that takes time and effort.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

 

The main reason for this post is to ask the community how long it took for them to learn GM and the GML.

 

-Did you have coding experience already?

-Have you been using it for years?

-How many hours did you put it to learning?

-If you have been using it since you were 12 is it to late for me to start learning now with the pursuit of making great games?

 

 

Some say it takes 10,000 hours to become a pro at something.

This means I would have to use GM for 5hrs a day for the next 5 1/2 years to become a pro.

Is that completely off base or is it possible to be proficient enough in a year or two?

 

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Edited by chance, 11 February 2016 - 05:04 PM.

  • 0
Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly
- Robert Kennedy
 

#38 Karurosu

Karurosu

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 382 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 February 2016 - 03:58 PM

Its very easy, should take you around 2 weeks to grasp well the basics
  • 0

If you´re reading this, it´s because I´m already dead. So if you want to communicate with my afterlife me,  send an email to: carlosmlg109@gmail.com -Available for hire, programmer and pixel artist-


#39 fel666

fel666

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1883 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 February 2016 - 04:35 PM

You never finish learning how to program. you will alwyas find new and better ways to do things.

 

GM was my first programming language, and within 2 weeks of using it, i could write very simple games.

a month after and i was making more complex games (like an rts, etc) though looking back my code was horrific.

a  year in and i could write more complex algorithms, and now, 5 years later, i am rather confident in my abilities (and have moved on to learn other languages), and although i do not qualify as a pro (im a student), i am only now starting to make (sort of) professional quality code (though with GM you often end up with spagheti code). (hence a programming masters takes 5 years)

i quickly developed a passion for programming and so i easilly put an average of 4 hours a day. (i often spent entire weekends programming).

 

i started using GM at the age of 13.

most people learn to code a university.

some of the best games you have played -> their programmers didnt know about computers when they where 22...

you are never to old to learn to program. infact, you can only be too young (though  feel i have good intuition because i started early, and so concepts like OO are intuitive to me).

 

i would advise that you use GM to learn the basics of programming, and to make games. but also to learn a more complete programming language like java, as i found it truely helped me become a better programmer (i have developed better techniques thanks to it). i feel like if i had started using other languages earlier, i would be further ahead than i am now.

 

 

My most important advice is that you shouldnt ask yourself if you are progressing. just keep making stuff, and you'll move forwards. Whenever you follow a tutorial, or find code online, try to re-use its concepts in different situations. this is what will allow you to develop your coding ability as fast as possible.


Edited by fel666, 11 February 2016 - 04:41 PM.

  • 0

This forum is old and archived, Whatever it is i said up above may no longer reflect my opinion.

GMWolf
GMIterator
RefactorTool
OptimizedDecals

#40 chance

chance

    GMC Member

  • Global Moderators
  • 8762 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 February 2016 - 05:09 PM

The main reason for this post is to ask the community how long it took for them to learn GM and the GML.
(snip)


As I mentioned in my PM, the best way to answer your question is to read other members' experiences learning GM. 

 

So I merged your topic into this existing topic.


  • 1

#41 Kuzie

Kuzie

    GMC Member

  • New Member
  • 9 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 February 2016 - 05:30 PM

Thanks for the insight fel666. I will keep at it with testing my own stuff and doing tutorials etc.

 

I actually just talked to a friend about working on a project together. He's an artists and has a good idea for a game.

Hopefully we can things started as many hands make light work. Working together hopefully we can bounce stuff off each other to learn more quickly.


  • 0
Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly
- Robert Kennedy
 

#42 KurtBlissZ

KurtBlissZ

    GMC noob

  • GMC Member
  • 752 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 February 2016 - 07:14 PM

I mostly just stole from Mark Overmars examples for his tutorials. I hate reading. I just looked at other people's work and just copied and paste. I seen it so much though I can type most of it out now. With help from the game maker manual. And google searches. Then asking for help tones of times from the community. 

 

I started out around 11 years old, around 16-17 years old I may of finally learned on how to use the game maker manual D; and now i'm 20. 


  • 0

#43 Jucarave

Jucarave

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 34 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 11 February 2016 - 07:18 PM

Before GM, I was learning RPG Maker and MUGEN, so I had a little of knowledge in programming, then I decided to learn 3D with GM and that exposed me to a bunch of advanced functions from the beginning, still, most of my knowledge came when I started working on the real world and learning from others programmers.


  • 0

#44 GameGoblin

GameGoblin

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 4325 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 February 2016 - 02:00 AM

Did you have coding experience already?

No. When I found GameMaker (about nine years) I knew nothing about programming. It is GameMaker that motivated me to learn other programming languages and make a career in software engineering.

Have you been using it for years?

Nine years approximately.

How many hours did you put it to learning?

GameMaker wasn't as advanced as it is today back then. New features were being added with every update, so I learned it over the course of a long period of time. It shouldn't take you more than a week to grasp the basics IMO.

If02you have been using it since you were 12 is it to late for me to start learning now with the pursuit of making great games?

Not at all. You can learn and start making games with GameMaker at any age if you're capable of grasping things fast enough.

Some say it takes 10,000 hours to become a pro at something.

That's plain nonsense. Slap whoever told you that. It actually depends on your capability to grasp things. Shaders took me nearly 160 hours to master (and I'm still learning).

This means I would have to use GM for 5hrs a day for the next 5 1/2 years to become a pro.

If you ask me, it shouldn't take you more than two years (depends on your grasping skills, though).

Is that completely off base or is it possible to be proficient enough in a year or two?

Yes, it is possible.

GameGoblin
  • 1

#45 Sethor

Sethor

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 88 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 February 2016 - 10:28 AM

I'm still at the very beginning stage of learning GML and have a small project that I'm working on and that I plan to expand in the future.

 

When I started with Game Maker, I literally devoured available tutorials (written & video) that I considered useful to proceed with my current project. The good thing about this method is that you quickly learn how other people achieved a certain thing and that you become familiar with GMS. The bad thing is that it only teaches you one single approach on how to achieve a certain thing and in the end you do not know how efficient the code is.

 

By now I find myself more and more following Game Goblins advice (thanks!): Look up the official documentation and knowledge base. Then I try to find my own solution to achieve certain things. I then often post questions with my code to get feedback.

 

Best

Sethor


  • 0

#46 fel666

fel666

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1883 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 February 2016 - 10:59 AM

@sethor
The point of tutorials inst to learn how to code, but to learn to progrm. They present new techniques that you may not have thought of before.
I would argue that by following a range of tutorials you can broaden you knoledge and learn techniques that can be applied to more than just the subject of the tutorial.
  • 0

This forum is old and archived, Whatever it is i said up above may no longer reflect my opinion.

GMWolf
GMIterator
RefactorTool
OptimizedDecals

#47 GameGoblin

GameGoblin

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 4325 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 February 2016 - 11:27 AM

They present new techniques that you may not have thought of before.


I whole-heartedly agree with you there. I have been saying this recently and I'll say it again: The Manual teaches you the ingredients, but not the recipe. For that, you need to follow good tutorials.

GameGoblin
  • 0

#48 Sethor

Sethor

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 88 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 February 2016 - 02:21 PM

@fel666:

 

I agree to a certain point. However, I do not think that the nature of a tutorial can automatically be defined as "teaches you to program" or "teaches you to code".

 

It very much depends on the content of a tutorial. Some tutorials act as manual and actually teach you how to code (e.g. http://www.w3schools.com/html/to learn HTML5) while others teach you how to use coding techniques to achieve certain things (http://lea.verou.me/css3patterns/ to create patterns with CSS3). The latter can be considered the "recipe" GameGoblin is referring to, because in the beginning CSS was never meant to draw extensive patterns.

 

I also agree that it can be doubted that you will become a full-fledged programmer by just following a range of tutorials. Programming is a complex thing that requires profound understanding of the basics and of course programmatic logic. In the past I worked together with programmers and I always respected them for their skills, but since I started scripting with GML my respect for programmers has tremendously increased. So, if you are programmer and read this - kudos, I salute to you and your skills!

 

But here comes the next however ... within the past decade, the nature of how software and especially games are built drastically changed. In the 80s, 90s and early 2000s it was mandatory to have highly skilled programmers with deep knowledge in complex programming languages like C++ in order to develop a game. The programmer basically created everything from scratch.

With the rise of game engines this changed. Of course you still need highly skilled programmers, but modern frameworks like Unreal Engine, Unity, GMS and Amazons Lumberyard next in the line enable even not so well trained programmers and people that are new to programming to produce games and/or other software. It is like a shift in the task of fields, where programmers more and more become responsible to provide the basis and tool sets for the creative guys. In addition, a lot of the communities of the mentioned engines provide assistance and loads of tutorials and with this knowledge you can become a profound game developer (not programmer!).

 

Explicit example:

I once worked with a C++ based scripting language called TA (short for trigger action) at the DAoC freeshard Uthgard. When developing the Tajendi expansion I came to a point where I wanted a boss monster to launch avalanches. The DAoC clients effects never intended to display such a large effect, but from a tutorial of one of the DEVs I learned how to trigger an effect with TA. I ended up creating several "effect NPCs" positioned in a square sized grid, added a "brain NPC" controlling the "effect NPCs" and then scripted the brainNPC to let the effectNPCs fire off a dmg spell plus a certain visual effect in a row. Et voilá. I had my avalanche.

 

Consuming a lot of tutorials teaches how specific things can be done. Therefore your knowledge on how to do certain things increases with the number of tutorials "consumed". And to finally come to an end and to again pick up GameGoblins example of recipes:

 

If you know the recipes for spaghetti bolognese and bread, the path to a pizza is set. All it takes is to throw the bolognese sauce on the bread and to then refine the recipe for bread. ;-)

 

Best

Sethor


  • 0

#49 11clock

11clock

    Mech. Game Designer

  • GMC Member
  • 2735 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 February 2016 - 02:38 PM

I made a bunch of crappy games, and made less crappy games over time. That is pretty much it, pure experimentation.


  • 0

qNDVrhl.png


#50 fel666

fel666

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1883 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 12 February 2016 - 02:46 PM

@sethor
I agree. Tutorials alone are not enough.
The most important thing is practice. This is what allows you to experiment and get a grasp on how things work.

The problem I have with people using tutorials to learn to code is that most tutorials out there show how a particular thing is implemented. This means that the code shown often implements more complicated systems that can confuse someone. It also means some of the basics are omitted. (I have tried to make basic tutorials on coding as I didn't find many out there, and understood the reason why.)

The main issue is that most people misunderstand how to use tutorials. They see them as free code they can use in their games. I know this as many people ask me to fix my tutorial code for particular situations (ie, views). This shows that they did not understand the idea being the mechanism showcased; as the solutions where rather simple (like transforming coordinates to view space).

The way a tutorial should be seen is not as a lesson on a particular solution to a problem, but rather a collection of examples showcasing both programming techniques (eg nested for loops) and general concepts (like normal mapping).
You should then find your own solution to the concept to suite your needs, and try to apply the techniques in different situations.
This will allow you to learn faster.

As for coding, the manual has all you need.
  • 1

This forum is old and archived, Whatever it is i said up above may no longer reflect my opinion.

GMWolf
GMIterator
RefactorTool
OptimizedDecals