Jump to content


Photo

Need Title for Indiana Jones-Inspired Platformer


  • Please log in to reply
82 replies to this topic

#31 twelveways

twelveways

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1383 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:02 AM

[*]Secondly, if you manage to get trough tons of deadly traps only because of your mega adventurer skills, how can you explain that the save guy did? The best way to avoid this issue is to have some sort of object as save points that may show up at loads of different places, and the player will assume it's different objects all the time.

Disagree with this, the vendor in Resident Evil springs to mind, it makes you think that there is more to the character because he can get to these places and seems oblivious to the problems you faced to get there.

Agree about breaking the 4th wall though, very few games pull it off well.
  • 0

#32 Yal

Yal

    Gun Princess

  • Global Moderators
  • 6966 posts
  • Version:GM8.1

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:08 AM

Disagree with this, the vendor in Resident Evil springs to mind

Remember that RE4 is set in the middle of a farmland? The main difference between an underground inca temple and the countryside is that there's more than one entrace.

To elaborate more precisely; RE4 has lots of different buildings you go trough, and there's many outdoor areas. The peddlar could take any way to reach the areas you find him in, and also most of these areas are "safe" (no enemies).
Also, the main danger in RE4 is zombies that attack you; everyone knows that zombies are easier to avoid than cleverly concealed arrow traps and gigant rolling boulders.
  • 0

#33 twelveways

twelveways

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1383 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:17 AM

True. Maybe the 'save guy' has always been in the temple, he could be an (almost) omnipotent priest who has the power to turn back time, you would have to bring him a relic (maybe a staone carving of a floppy disk) in order to save
  • 0

#34 twelveways

twelveways

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1383 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:22 AM

on topic:

If you are going for a humourous approach then alliteration works better than rhyme for names, Archaelogists/explorers are usually from quite posh backgrounds as well, so try to convey that in the name.
  • 0

#35 Adequate

Adequate

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 479 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:29 AM

comic relief: just call him dathan nrake
  • 0

#36 twelveways

twelveways

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1383 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:30 AM

Massachusets Smith
  • 0

#37 chance

chance

    GMC Member

  • Global Moderators
  • 6818 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 15 February 2012 - 12:42 PM

Massachusets Smith

But what would his nickname be then? Massy? Or worse... Chu Chu?
  • 0

#38 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:04 PM

but Google Translator translates it as 'takes first.'

That would fit in with the theme, no? Both you and your rival tries to reach the treasure first?


Here is what the game looks like so far:

so here is the opening cutscene and conversation with the Save Guy.

Facepalm. Okay, I'm outta here.


Or, well, not without constructive criticism:
  • Bland dialogue. Needs more one-liners. Especially the hero should repeatedly say stuff that makes him sound really cool. Listen to some Eddy Murphy movies and steal oneliners straight off them, copy lines from real Indy movies, Clint Eastwood movies, and so on. Just modify them to match the situation where you want them in. If possible, do NOT use show_message() for the dialogue; I think your game would be best off with minimal dialogue, having VOICE ACTED dialogue (make your dad voice the protagonist, I'm fairly sure he'll love to say cool Indy oneliners) with movie-styled subtitles in the bottom of the screen.
  • Do NOT use a "Save Guy", and especially, don't let the protagonist COMMENT on the fact that it is possible to save the game. This is for multiple reasons:
  • First of all, you're breaking the fourth wall and the Suppression Of Disbelief, making the player get less immersed in the game. The best way to avoid this issue: make the save points non-sentient objects, preferably floppy disks so that the player won't even need a tutorial to know what they are (everyone instantly knows floppy disk = save just as they know heart = hp up).
  • Secondly, if you manage to get trough tons of deadly traps only because of your mega adventurer skills, how can you explain that the save guy did? The best way to avoid this issue is to have some sort of object as save points that may show up at loads of different places, and the player will assume it's different objects all the time.
So my suggestion is: do like Mother 3 and use frogs as save points. There live frogs all over the word except for the poles so you can put them anywhere; they are really colorful so they will stick out enough to be obvious while still they blend in the background because they're animals; and they're not sentient enough to talk so they can't break the fourth wall no matter how hard they try.


A typical cutscene could be like this:

Bob: "...Bellocque!"
BCQ: "Ah ha ha! Bobby, haven't you realized that there's nothing you find I cannot take from you?"
*Boss battle ensues*

I've never planned to use show_message(), I have a fancy textbox engine that my friend made for me.
I will not have voice acting in my game, or any of my future games. I'm highly opposed to voice acting.
I was intending to use fourth-wall-breaking jokes throughout the game as humor, but I'll probably cut it back a bit. I already have the Save Guy programmed into the game, but it should be easy enough to modify him. I like jokes that break the fourth wall, though.
As for one-liners, there should be plenty of them throughout the game. I just couldn't find a place to fit any in the opening cutscene.

And please, do NOT judge my game or my future games by the graphics. I'm a programmer, not an artist. My art does not determine how good the game is, and my games are often much better than they look.

Edited by 11clock, 15 February 2012 - 10:28 PM.

  • 0

#39 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 16 February 2012 - 01:15 AM

So I decided to name the rival treasure hunter Eugene Clyde, or just Clyde. I think it sounds good for an antagonist. What do you think?

At the moment I'm debating "Toma Prima" and "Bible Hunt" for the title of the game.

EDIT: I have a feeling that people are thinking that I'm new to Game Maker. I'd like to state that I'm no stranger to Game Maker and I've been working with it for about four years. I'm still learning, but I know how to read code quite well, and I'm an expert at level designing.

Edited by 11clock, 16 February 2012 - 01:23 AM.

  • 0

#40 Saijee

Saijee

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 2412 posts
  • Version:Unknown

Posted 16 February 2012 - 02:41 AM

I have a feeling that people are thinking that I'm new to Game Maker. I'd like to state that I'm no stranger to Game Maker and I've been working with it for about four years. I'm still learning, but I know how to read code quite well, and I'm an expert at level designing.

I base judge books by their covers, and the cover you showed us (screen shot) didn't look very impressive.
  • 0

#41 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 16 February 2012 - 03:21 AM

I have a feeling that people are thinking that I'm new to Game Maker. I'd like to state that I'm no stranger to Game Maker and I've been working with it for about four years. I'm still learning, but I know how to read code quite well, and I'm an expert at level designing.

I base judge books by their covers, and the cover you showed us (screen shot) didn't look very impressive.

Art and programming are two COMPLETELY different things. A screenshot doesn't tell you anything about the programming, you'll need to play the game yourself when I'm finished in order to judge the game properly.

People and graphics these days. You don't need fancy pansy graphics to make a good game. <.<

EDIT: I have proof that I am not a newb at game making. My entry to the Game Maker Jam #5, Falling for Milk, scored 10th place out of over 60 entries.
http://gmc.yoyogames...dpost&p=3907212

I've also won a Retro Game Competition and a Caiman Game Competition with my games Quick Run and Tazer, found on my website linked in my signature.

Edited by 11clock, 16 February 2012 - 03:37 AM.

  • 0

#42 Saijee

Saijee

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 2412 posts
  • Version:Unknown

Posted 16 February 2012 - 03:34 AM


I have a feeling that people are thinking that I'm new to Game Maker. I'd like to state that I'm no stranger to Game Maker and I've been working with it for about four years. I'm still learning, but I know how to read code quite well, and I'm an expert at level designing.

I base judge books by their covers, and the cover you showed us (screen shot) didn't look very impressive.

Art and programming are two COMPLETELY different things. A screenshot doesn't tell you anything about the programming, you'll need to play the game yourself when I'm finished in order to judge the game properly.

People and graphics these days. You don't need fancy pansy graphics to make a good game. <.<

Graphics is not what I'm referring to, I'm talking about art work/ art style.

Giving a game quality artwork will visually show the players that you cared to make the game good. In all honestly, this game of yours sounded a lot cooler before you showed that image.

Edited by Saijee, 16 February 2012 - 03:46 AM.

  • 0

#43 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 16 February 2012 - 03:43 AM



I have a feeling that people are thinking that I'm new to Game Maker. I'd like to state that I'm no stranger to Game Maker and I've been working with it for about four years. I'm still learning, but I know how to read code quite well, and I'm an expert at level designing.

I base judge books by their covers, and the cover you showed us (screen shot) didn't look very impressive.

Art and programming are two COMPLETELY different things. A screenshot doesn't tell you anything about the programming, you'll need to play the game yourself when I'm finished in order to judge the game properly.

People and graphics these days. You don't need fancy pansy graphics to make a good game. <.<

Giving a game quality artwork will visually show the players that you cared to make the game good. In all honestly, this game of yours sounded a lot cooler before you showed that image.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvoULliKBvI
This game proves otherwise. I'd much rather spend more time improving the gameplay than focusing on the graphics. It doesn't matter if it looks good, it matters if it plays good.

And I edited my previous post with proof that I am no stranger to game making.
  • 0

#44 Saijee

Saijee

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 2412 posts
  • Version:Unknown

Posted 16 February 2012 - 03:59 AM

I have to object to that statement. Simply put, it's different with indie games.

I don't think I've played an indie game that looked nice and played like trash.

It's people like you who make me grind my teeth. Some people here may remember from my previous topic, where I was in a position similar to you against me right now. People were complaining about my graphics not being top notch.

I am no graphics tard, I don't think things need to be PS3 Quality to look good.

However I absolutely detest the mentality of: Graphics have absolutely no value when a quality gameplay will suffice.

As much as it is important for a game to be fun, it is also important that it is fun to look at. Especially if it is a long adventure type game. If it does not look good enough then it will detract a lot of gamers.

I'm not a graphics tard, and I'm not a gameplay>>>graphics tard, but I am a firm believer that it is important for a good game to have good visual art, at the very least the art style must be charming in some way.

In your game your adventurer looks like a megavitamen.

There are quite a few games that don't have the best graphics, but have quite likeable art that helps make the game feel a lot more enjoyable.

Edited by Saijee, 16 February 2012 - 07:19 AM.

  • 1

#45 chance

chance

    GMC Member

  • Global Moderators
  • 6818 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 16 February 2012 - 11:10 AM

However I absolutely detest the mentality of: Graphics have absolutely no value when a quality gameplay will suffice.

Saijee, nobody is saying they have "absolutely no value". Who are you arguing with?



At the moment I'm debating "Toma Prima" and "Bible Hunt" for the title of the game.

"Bible Hunt" is OK... but it sounds like a game about Bible verses.

I'd go with something more mysterious, like "The Final Codex". Or maybe the "The Lost Apocrypha"
  • 0

#46 Saijee

Saijee

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 2412 posts
  • Version:Unknown

Posted 16 February 2012 - 03:20 PM

Saijee, nobody is saying they have "absolutely no value". Who are you arguing with?

That's why I put it in italics not quote marks. I'm not arguing with anyone personally, but the majority of people who throw their games on the yoyogames sand box. In fact I'd say it is this mentality that is the reason why Game Maker has such a bad reputation.

While he didn't say it directly, this showed that he was thinking something similar:

It doesn't matter if it looks good, it matters if it plays good.


  • 0

#47 twelveways

twelveways

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1383 posts

Posted 16 February 2012 - 03:37 PM

If your game is comedic and not set in the real world then why have a bible in it at all? As you said yourself, the bible may put a lot of people off the game. You should keep real world religions out of games and go for something from mythology or fable, or at least a 'dead' religion like the Norse gods or Egyptian, Atlantean even.

just my opinon.
  • 0

#48 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 17 February 2012 - 01:03 AM

The problem is that I'm not an artist. I mean, I can't even draw a stick figure right (I'm serious). I can't do art, and I don't have the patience to draw. I've been trying to find a good art style that is quick and simple to use, but it looks good as well. I've thought that my strait-line, single-color, 2x2 pixel style would do fine, but apparently not. I'm not aiming for realism, and I don't plan on ever making a realistic game, but I still wish I had the patience to draw something decent.

@twelveways Good point, but I still want to use a book as the artifact. Here is a quick back-story I came up with, if I don't use the Bible.

Once, there was a young researcher called Jemiah. He wanted to unlock the secrets of the Universe, and one day, he did. Jemiah wrote a book, the Golden Tome, that shares what he's discovered. However, he was afraid that some villain would use the knowledge for his or her own personal gain. Jemiah kept the Golden Tome hidden away, thinking about destroying it. Days later after the book was completed, Jemiah caught a fatal illness. In the last hours of his time on Earth, he decided to hide the book away for someone else to find, hopefully someone with a good heart. He ventured into a deep cave, and died with the Golden Tome in his hands. The secrets of the Universe remained hidden...

...Until now.

What do you think?

Edited by 11clock, 17 February 2012 - 04:21 AM.

  • 0

#49 Saijee

Saijee

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 2412 posts
  • Version:Unknown

Posted 17 February 2012 - 03:19 AM

You know several of the people who have successful games said "I don't know how to draw", or were seen as not being experts in the field, when they had to draw their characters.

Shigaru Miyamoto:
Posted Image

Daisuke Amaya:
Posted Image

ZUN:
Posted Image

And none of the above were aiming to anything close to realism.

Edited by Saijee, 17 February 2012 - 03:29 AM.

  • 0

#50 Yal

Yal

    Gun Princess

  • Global Moderators
  • 6966 posts
  • Version:GM8.1

Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:33 PM

but I still wish I had the patience to draw something decent.

It's not about time; you can doodle decent graphics in five minutes once you know how.

tSR "Spriting Dictionary And Resources" topic? Also look for tutorials and stuff. Following these made me improve a lot in the course of a few weeks; should be the same for you.
http://spriters-reso...d.php?tid=13868
  • 0

#51 chance

chance

    GMC Member

  • Global Moderators
  • 6818 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:46 PM

Here is a quick back-story I came up with, if I don't use the Bible.

<story>

Not bad. But why shy away from the Bible? A story about finding biblical artifacts doesn't have to be "religious". And even for non-Christians, the Bible's interesting because there's so much real history. Both in it... and about it. There's mystery and intrigue, strange cults, lost artifacts, buried ruins, etc. And it's all real.

Also, if you want to be clever you can use biblical "references" in the game. Most players wouldn't even notice. But someone educated about the Bible might have fun finding them all.

For example, the hero/archaeologist rents a boat to cross a lake, and the boat pilot is named Shem. Or there's a road sign that says "Nod, 10 miles east" . Character names can also have hidden meaning too. Like Abel Adamson. Joseph Jacobson.

Edited by chance, 17 February 2012 - 12:47 PM.

  • 0

#52 twelveways

twelveways

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1383 posts

Posted 17 February 2012 - 01:37 PM

I like the alternative story better, a book with secrets that could destroy/alter the world is much more interesting than some stories about some people who lived a long time ago. It allows you to use your imagination and create a bit more fantasy. The only reason to search for a bible is if you are a collector or you want to sell it.

If you wanted it based in reality then the ancient Egyptians had a 'Book of the Dead' that is half real and half mythological, you could use artistic license and have it so that it grants the reader the power to raise the dead. Maybe some billionaire's wife has just died and he hires the protagonist to find it for him. at the end you realise he was lying and instead he wants to create an undead army so the final mission would be to stop him.

Edited by twelveways, 17 February 2012 - 01:40 PM.

  • 0

#53 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 17 February 2012 - 03:47 PM

How about this:

Both the Bible and the Golden Tome will be in the game. Going after the Golden Tome is the main storyline, but you later find out about the First Bible. Going after it is optional, and doing the optional quest will lead to a boss much more powerful than the final boss in the game, and the quest overall asks much more from the player.

@Yal: Another issue with drawing for me is that I have a minor case of OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder). If you look at the picture of my game, notice how the character and cacti are almost symmetrical.
Another issue is shading. How do I keep it constant if I'll be flipping graphics and rotating them throughout the game? It's impossible to keep shading consistent, unless I use a lighting engine. That's why I use simple colors.
  • 1

#54 chance

chance

    GMC Member

  • Global Moderators
  • 6818 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 17 February 2012 - 06:00 PM

How about this:

Both the Bible and the Golden Tome will be in the game.

What a diplomat. +1 :tongue:

I'm just saying you don't have to abandon biblical themes, just because someone might think it's a "religious game". Games that include biblical themes don't need to be religious.

But twelveways makes a good point. Fantasy themes give you more freedom. So I'd say use whatever theme feels most natural, and most inspiring.
  • 0

#55 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 18 February 2012 - 02:59 AM

I just finished making Judonus Desert: Right and the first boss.

I'll upload an alpha after I'm done tweaking things.

I'm considering naming the game "Quest for the Golden Tome."

The name of the antagonist is Eugene Clyde.

The name of the protagonist is still undecided.

Edited by 11clock, 18 February 2012 - 04:01 AM.

  • 0

#56 twelveways

twelveways

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 1383 posts

Posted 18 February 2012 - 01:05 PM

Arthur Edward Faxe

(Art E. Faxe)

Or in the same vein:

Raymond Theodore Faxe

(R.T.Faxe)

Maybe a little cheesy but it could work if you never refer to him as the shortened version in the game, just by either his first or last name, never both at the same time
  • 0

#57 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 18 February 2012 - 03:52 PM

Arthur Edward Faxe

(Art E. Faxe)

Or in the same vein:

Raymond Theodore Faxe

(R.T.Faxe)

Maybe a little cheesy but it could work if you never refer to him as the shortened version in the game, just by either his first or last name, never both at the same time

I see wut u did there.

I like the name Arthur Edward Faxe. Thanks for the suggestions!

This game is now an official WiP. I'll post a new topic in the WiP section after I get the alpha out.

EDIT: Here is the WiP topic! http://gmc.yoyogames...howtopic=532047
The discussion of the game should be continued there.

Edited by 11clock, 18 February 2012 - 05:39 PM.

  • 0

#58 Yal

Yal

    Gun Princess

  • Global Moderators
  • 6966 posts
  • Version:GM8.1

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:06 AM

Another issue with drawing for me is that I have a minor case of OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder).

Oh. I figure that can cause issues with more or less anything, not just drawing...


Another issue is shading. How do I keep it constant if I'll be flipping graphics and rotating them throughout the game?

Rule of thumb: nobody will notice. Most people don't even notice that the protagonist swaps out his sword and shield arm whenever turning around in most games.

I can't promise anything, but if I whipped up a small 16x16 graphics sheet for you, would you use it?
  • 1

#59 Saijee

Saijee

    GMC Member

  • GMC Member
  • 2412 posts
  • Version:Unknown

Posted 20 February 2012 - 10:17 AM

I can't promise anything, but if I whipped up a small 16x16 graphics sheet for you, would you use it?


Take the offer! It's the better option! And your probably not going to ever get this offer from anyone else.

Edited by Saijee, 20 February 2012 - 03:03 PM.

  • 0

#60 11clock

11clock

    Christian Pacifist

  • GMC Member
  • 1855 posts
  • Version:GM:Studio

Posted 20 February 2012 - 05:16 PM

Another issue with drawing for me is that I have a minor case of OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder).

Oh. I figure that can cause issues with more or less anything, not just drawing...


Another issue is shading. How do I keep it constant if I'll be flipping graphics and rotating them throughout the game?

Rule of thumb: nobody will notice. Most people don't even notice that the protagonist swaps out his sword and shield arm whenever turning around in most games.

I can't promise anything, but if I whipped up a small 16x16 graphics sheet for you, would you use it?

Depends on if I like it or not.

I guess I'll try some light shading, like I did with the gradient backgrounds.

The OCD is only minor, so I am able to fight it. It's annoying, though.

Edited by 11clock, 20 February 2012 - 05:18 PM.

  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users