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How much of the creation is truely yours?


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#1 Snowconesolid

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 04:26 AM

Hi everybody, Im new here and recently started using game maker. I think its a great program and very easy to use to create some awsome games with.

However, I have a question about the things that are created with game maker.
I was not sure exactly where to put this topic so I thought Id put it here.

well ok heres whats been going through my head. How much of the creations made in game maker are truly yours?
I mean how much of the creation do us (the creators) actually own?

See, I hope to make some truly original games with this. becoming an Indie game dev is something I have always wanted. But what if we made a really awsome game, and it became popular and other companies for example, lets say microsoft wants to sell it on XBLA, Do we still own all rights to the game?

Or since the whole game was created with game maker (which also has gamemakers code in it) does that mean yoyogames owns full rights to our game creations? and they can do what ever they want with it?

so in short, Im just asking if we own full rights to the things we create with game maker or not.

once again, this is probably not the right place to be posting this topic, if it is I am sorry and please go ahead and remove it.

thanks for any help/feedback in advance.
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#2 GameGeisha

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 06:00 AM

well ok heres whats been going through my head. How much of the creations made in game maker are truly yours?
I mean how much of the creation do us (the creators) actually own?

You own every part that you created. The graphics are yours, the sounds are yours, the music is yours and the code is yours, as long as you are the one who made them. The only thing that YoYo has a claim on is the runner.

See, I hope to make some truly original games with this. becoming an Indie game dev is something I have always wanted. But what if we made a really awsome game, and it became popular and other companies for example, lets say microsoft wants to sell it on XBLA, Do we still own all rights to the game?

You will retain all rights that you have not yet signed away to the other company. For instance, YoYo's game publishing service contains an exclusivity clause. In that case you will no longer have the right to sign publishing contracts with another company regarding games you publish through it, but you will retain the rights to the rest of the resources in the game and the full rights to any other games you create that are not involved in the contract.

But in all honesty, I think worrying about this while starting out is a little farfetched. It will likely take many, many years before you can even come close to creating something that a big company would want to publish. Learning how to use GM and make a game should be your first priority now.

GameGeisha

Edit: Also, what is this doing in Open Source? Your logic really does delude me, as it seems what you're aiming towards is as far as you can get from FOSS. Questions like this should be posted in Distribution.

Edited by GameGeisha, 20 November 2011 - 06:05 AM.

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#3 Snowconesolid

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 06:53 AM


well ok heres whats been going through my head. How much of the creations made in game maker are truly yours?
I mean how much of the creation do us (the creators) actually own?

You own every part that you created. The graphics are yours, the sounds are yours, the music is yours and the code is yours, as long as you are the one who made them. The only thing that YoYo has a claim on is the runner.

See, I hope to make some truly original games with this. becoming an Indie game dev is something I have always wanted. But what if we made a really awsome game, and it became popular and other companies for example, lets say microsoft wants to sell it on XBLA, Do we still own all rights to the game?

You will retain all rights that you have not yet signed away to the other company. For instance, YoYo's game publishing service contains an exclusivity clause. In that case you will no longer have the right to sign publishing contracts with another company regarding games you publish through it, but you will retain the rights to the rest of the resources in the game and the full rights to any other games you create that are not involved in the contract.

But in all honesty, I think worrying about this while starting out is a little farfetched. It will likely take many, many years before you can even come close to creating something that a big company would want to publish. Learning how to use GM and make a game should be your first priority now.

GameGeisha

Edit: Also, what is this doing in Open Source? Your logic really does delude me, as it seems what you're aiming towards is as far as you can get from FOSS. Questions like this should be posted in Distribution.



haha, like I said I am still new here. I should of looked through the forum more.
anyway back on main topic, thanks that was informative. I appreciate it.

The reason as to why I am thinking about these types of issues right now is because it takes lots of time to learn about a new game engine. And I don't want to waste time learning about something and in the end not get any credit for the hard work. you see I am trying to pick up and learn about a game development tool that gives me full rights to everything created with it. At the same time I am considering learning about Blender, the free 3d program that also offers a built in game engine. Im thinking about the same questions I mentioned in this post and see if they apply to blender.
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#4 Zesterer

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 09:20 AM

I advise you to spend a few years practising first. It is easy to use most GM functions, but VERY hard to mix them all together in to something that people will play again and again, without getting bored.
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#5 Snowconesolid

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 07:50 PM

I advise you to spend a few years practising first. It is easy to use most GM functions, but VERY hard to mix them all together in to something that people will play again and again, without getting bored.


I agree with you. I am currently reading a book called "The Game Makers Apprentice" which came with the game maker program. Its a great book so far and it makes game maker seem very easy to use. Also it introduces the game development concepts to someone who has never made games in a very understanding way.
Really at momment I am only planning on working on some fan made games, just to test out my skill. then in the future I hope to release more original games.

EDIT: since we are one the topic off this I have one more question.
Are we able to enter our original games made in GameMaker into competitions such as IGF and such? (Independent Games Festival)

Edited by Snowconesolid, 20 November 2011 - 08:52 PM.

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#6 GameGeisha

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 10:40 PM

According to IGF's official rules:

The IGF Main Competition is open to independent games developed on PC, console or mobile and handheld platforms (iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad, PSP, DS, cell phone, Android, PDA).

Please, if you plan on competing in contests or sell indie games for income, you've got to learn how to read documentation.

GameGeisha
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#7 varkarrus

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 11:54 PM

The most recent game I'm making (HAM) is completely mine and my friends ideas. Save for 1 Dopefish card that is well hidden. And a few poop-culture references.
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#8 Snowconesolid

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 12:57 AM

According to IGF's official rules:


The IGF Main Competition is open to independent games developed on PC, console or mobile and handheld platforms (iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad, PSP, DS, cell phone, Android, PDA).

Please, if you plan on competing in contests or sell indie games for income, you've got to learn how to read documentation.

GameGeisha


ahh I see. I read somewhere on yoyo games site that they publish games on Playstation network, apple devices, and more.

I really hope I am not leaving the wrong impression here, I really do enjoy game dev as a hobby and im not only focused on income and publishing. Hopefully in the future I can prove my love for gaming and development on this site with some cool releases. And I believe gamemaker is such a great place to start off because of the simplicity of the engine. It introduces you to what goes on in an actual game program visually.
I think its also a good place to start off your learning game programming. Because once someone goes on to learn about game programming, they can just remember what the function of the picture and translate it into words, or code.

sorry im kinda getting off topic here.
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#9 GMkizzle

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 12:17 PM

Sorry but I had to butt in. You said earlier that it takes lots of time to learn a new game engine. Well with game maker that is not the case... one of game makers biggest selling points is that it is so easy to use. It takes a month or two max to have mastered the core aspects of the program.

But if you want to make it big and get it published by big companies, learning programming languages like c++ or Java and making your own game engine, or learning high-end game engines like the UDK or Unity3d would be the way to go.

Dont get me wrong though, Game Maker is a very impressive program and can create some pretty great casual games. But planning to go big with game maker is a choice i recommend not taking.

Edited by GMkizzle, 21 November 2011 - 12:23 PM.

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#10 Snowconesolid

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 06:59 PM

Sorry but I had to butt in. You said earlier that it takes lots of time to learn a new game engine. Well with game maker that is not the case... one of game makers biggest selling points is that it is so easy to use. It takes a month or two max to have mastered the core aspects of the program.

But if you want to make it big and get it published by big companies, learning programming languages like c++ or Java and making your own game engine, or learning high-end game engines like the UDK or Unity3d would be the way to go.

Dont get me wrong though, Game Maker is a very impressive program and can create some pretty great casual games. But planning to go big with game maker is a choice i recommend not taking.


yes I have heard some amazing things about unity, some amazing games have been made with it. I also heard that unity is very friendly when it comes to new programmers (I do have a very small background in java programming and just the basics of programming such as if statements, loops, using variables etc, but im no professional and cant really make anything useful at the momment with my programming skills. I hope to improve them in the future greatly.) besides their is tuts everywhere. learning unity in the future will definitely be worth it. I know it uses javascript, boo and C(forgot if it was C# or C++, some form of C, lol)

However, at the momment, for beginner game devs, I think GameMaker is an excellent place to start off. Its good to make small prototypes of games with or to just test out your ideas that you want to later expand in a different program. And for 2d games I think game maker is perfect. I guess in the end, the more game dev programs you know how to use the better.
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#11 lmbarns

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 06:59 PM

Unity is awesome....only reason Im not using it at the moment is because I've been working on mobile games and can't afford the licenses but discovering Unity changed my outlook on life as it was my introduction to game dev. It was the first game engine I actually could understand with the power to rapidly build complex worlds......also with great documentation, great code examples, and a great community. Far easier than developing with xna (unity just comes bundled ready to go compared to xna), UDK, etc. Heck, with cryengine it takes almost 2 pages of code to perform the same raycast it takes only 8 lines to do in unity.

Actually, if I had the money to buy all the licenses I'd be using it for mobile games too...for 3d web games it's pretty amazing....in 5 weeks having never used c# before I had a 3d aim-to-hit recreation of Ultima online's map with darkfall online's gameplay where you can jump/dodge projectiles to avoid damage, throw explosion potions, shoot spells, shoot arrows, parry, etc with the collision collider on the weapon blade or spell/arrow so you had to actually hit the opponent's hitbox/mesh to trigger damage functions. This is a video of the gameplay played in firefox: http://www.youtube.c...=5&feature=plcp

But it's pretty nasty for if you're new to coding. I quit developing that game because I hit a wall getting it to be multiplayer which was my main motivation....when I have a lot of free time I'll buy some books and see what I can do but until then I'm just prototyping mobile 2d games...

But I'm finding out game engine is not as important as project management skills...Currently in school I just started a Project Management Class where we have to take some Comptia PM certification and after reading the first chapter of the book I sat down and defined the project for the current game I've been twiddling around with and instantly I'm 10x further along.

Once you know what the project consists of, to be complete, it's just a matter of looking up each remaining piece regardless of framework....if you just sit around working on "mechanics" or "features" it's really hard to complete anything, but can be educational....

Edited by lmbarns, 02 January 2012 - 07:23 PM.

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